Search results for Water Legend Award

2005 Legend

Chuck Parrett, 2005 Water Legend Chuck Parrett U.S. Geological Survey Chuck Parrett is a Montana native who has worked for the Montana U.S. Geological Survey Science Center since 1977. In his pre-USGS life, he worked for 8 years as a hydrologist/hydraulic engineer for two different Montana state agencies (MDT and DNRC). He received a B.S. in Engineering Science from Montana Tech in 1967 and an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Montana State University in the 1970. While in Montana Chuck worked on a wide variety of surface-water investigations of floods and flood-frequency, flood-plain delineation, bridge scour, statewide streamflow estimation methods, wildfire hydrology, and extreme precipitation frequency. In the course of this work, he as has authored and coauthored close to 100 papers and reports that apply both simple and complex science and engineering principles to understanding the distribution, availability, and effects of surface water in Montana. Anyone associated with water science or management in Montana has this in common–they know and respect Chuck and his contribution to the better management of Montana’s water resources. Chuck recently accepted a position with the USGS in Sacramento, where he and his wife Bonnie can be close to their daughter’s family. We wish them good luck in their role as grandparents, and many happy returns to Montana. A Bigger, Broader Tribute to Water Legend Chuck Parrett I’m still kicking myself for not standing up in front of the crowd at AWRA to broaden the heartfelt tributes to Chuck Parrett, who last week was inducted into the Water Legend hall of fame. So here goes – my belated tribute. Like Steve Hollenbeck, Chuck Dalby and Bob Davis, who actually gave speeches at the ceremony, I, too, had the honor of working with Chuck for a number of years. I, too, immensely admire his scientific and technical accomplishments, his clear thinking, and his prolific publications. And I, too, benefited greatly from his patient mentoring, even though we worked in separate sections of the USGS and officially had no mutual responsibilities. Steve and Bob ably documented those aspects of the newest Water Legend. But what they did not mention – and what I think is of at least equal importance – are his voluntary contributions to the community and to the water resources to which he devotes his career. Finding his home located almost precisely on the cusp between two hydrologic subunits, Chuck became a founding and active member of not one, but two citizen-led watershed groups, Upper and Lower Tenmile Creek. Lending his professional expertise to those groups, Chuck helped educate his fellow citizens who care about their environment. With his calm and straightforward demeanor, he helped guide and focus the enthusiastic group energies, providing reality checks where needed. He helped both groups obtain assistance from the USGS, and helped the USGS understand the groups’ needs and tailor its work accordingly. And he made certain the groups understood the implications of the scientific work so they could use it effectively. Scientific prowess is indeed worth honoring. But in my mind it takes more than that to be a true Water Legend. Chuck Parrett decidedly deserves the award because he applies his exemplary talents not only on the job, but also in the community; not only to the advancement of science, but also to making the world a better place. Eloise Kendy Hydrogeologist Nov. 1,...

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2008 Legend

Bill Woessner, 2008 Water Legend Bill Woessner University of Montana Dr. William (“Bill”) W. Woessner, arrived in Montana in 1975 as a hydrogeologist for the Northern Cheyenne Research Project. Working out of Lame Deer, MT, he led a team that examined potential effects of energy development on groundwater and surface -water quality and quantity. He also served as part-time faculty member at Rocky Mountain College and worked on his PhD (1978) in Geology (Hydrogeology) at University of Wisconsin, Madison. After serving as an Assistant Research Professor at the University of Nevada System’s Water Resources Center of the Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada and as a liaison with the University of Nevada Las Vegas, Bill finally settled in as a faculty member of the University of Montana, Department of Geology in 1981. As a faculty member Bill has served as a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Groundwater Research, University of Waterloo, Ontario, spent five terms on the faculty senate, has been a member of three committees of the National Research Council, and was named Regents’ Professor at the University of Montana in 2004. At this writing, Bill has published over 60 articles in peer-reviewed journals, given in excess of 200 presentations to scholarly societies, co-authored a widely-used text on groundwater modeling (Applied Groundwater Modeling), and continues to serve on numerous national and international advisory and oversight committees dealing with groundwater science and management. In 2005, he was selected as the Geological Society of America’s Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer in Hydrogeology. Last year he was recognized with the John Hem Excellence in Science and Engineering Award presented by the Association of Ground Water Scientists and Engineers Membership Division of the National Ground Water Association. However, with all of these achievements, perhaps Bill’s greatest has been education and mentoring a series of undergraduate, MS and PhD students who have contributed greatly to the understanding and responsible management of Montana’s surface water and groundwater resources. Montana is blessed with many talented water-resource professionals, but it’s difficult to find one who has accomplished more as a distinguished scholar, remarkable educator, and friend to all who know him. For these reasons, and in recognition of his dedicated service to Montana and our organization, Professor Bill Woessner is recognized as a Montana Section AWRA Water...

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Water Legends

Montana Water Legends In recognition of everyday people with extra-ordinary dedication… Initiated in 1996, this award highlights individuals who are true legends in the Montana water arena. 2013 – Tom Osborne, Hydro Solutions Inc, Billings 2011 – Tom Patton, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, Montana Tech 2008 – Bill Woessner, University of Montana 2005 – Chuck Parrett, U.S.G.S. 2004 – Wayne Van Voast, Montana Tech of the University of Montana 2000 – Steve Custer, Earth Science, MSU 1999 – Jane Holzer, Montana Salinity Control Association 1998 – Ron Shields, U.S.G.S. 1997 – Marvin Miller, Associate Director, MBMG 1996 – Phil Farnes, State Snow Survey...

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2014 Meeting

Thanks to all who made the MT AWRA 2014 Annual Meeting: “Floods, Forests, and the Flathead” a success!   Keynote Speaker POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS Carol Collier – AWRA President Two Water Organizations: National AWRA – Directions for the Future and DRBC – Planning for the Basin Changing Needs [17.3 MB PDF] Mike Hightower – Sandia National Laboratories Energy Water Nexus in the Western U.S.: Emerging Trends and Impacts [3.4 MB PDF] The 2014 Annual Meeting of the Montana Section of AWRA was held at the Hilton Garden in Kalispell October 9-10, 2014. Around 160 people registered for the conference. Forty one speakers and twenty three poster presenters highlighted current water research being conducted throughout Montana. The conference also had the usual good turnout of student presenters, representing the Salish and Kootenai College, University of Montana, Montana Tech and Montana State University. For the pre-conference field trip, Bureau of Mines and Geology hydrogeologists John Wheaton and James Rose showed us the complex geohydrology of the Flathead Valley and Peter McCarthy spoke about the 1964 floods. After the field trip, runners and walkers raced and strolled through historic Kalispell during the annual Hydrophile 3-mile event. Also, on the Wednesday morning before the conference, the Montana Natural Heritage Program offered a two-hour training: Montana Wetland and Riparian Maps: Where to Find Them and How to Use Them. Thursday morning began with conference introductions followed by an update on the CKST Water Rights Settlement and on legislative issues by Jason Mohr. Then, the first of two keynote addresses was provided by C. Mark Dunning, President of National AWRA and senior planner and project manager for CDM Smith in Fairfax, VA. Mark spoke about National AWRA efforts to better connect with and serve state sections and members. After the morning break, Lawrence E. Band presented the 2014 Birdsall-Dreiss Lecture; Critical zone processes at the watershed scale: Hydroclimate and groundwater flowpath mediated evolution of forest canopy patterns. He spoke about research linking surface/subsurface flowpath dynamics with ecosystem development in forested and urban sites. Then, Chuck Parrett and his son Aaron Parrett wrapped up the plenary session with a presentation on the 1964 floods in northwestern Montana. Chuck spoke about the technical challenges related to estimating frequencies of large floods, given the massive scale of the 1964 event. Aaron spoke about the floods’ devastating effects on the Blackfeet Reservation (documented in his Montana History article Montana’s Worst Natural Disaster-the 1964 Flood on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation). During lunch, Antony Berthelote spoke about creating and developing the Salish Kootenai College Science Hydrology Program, which he directs. The SKC Science Hydrology Program helps students prepare for solving water resources and climate problems using both Western and Tribal scientific knowledge and values. After the concurrent technical sessions, attendees enjoyed refreshments and excellent posters, to the lively music of Aaron and Nan Parrett. At the annual banquet we were treated to a presentation by Gina Loss, NOAA Hydrologist: Voices on the Past – Weather Forecaster Recounts the Conditions Leading to and Impacts of the Montana Flood Of 1964. Gina interviewed Warren Harding, retired U.S. Weather Bureau forecaster, who was on duty in Great Falls as the floods swept northwestern Montana. We listened to Warren’s moving recollections of the 1964 weather and river events, along with many interesting observations contrasting weather forecasts then and now, while we viewed photos of the 1964 floods. The banquet ended after we viewed breathtaking images submitted by MT AWRA photographers for the annual photo contest; the lucky winner walked away with a stuffed mountain goat (polyester and cotton). The conference concluded (after more technical concurrent sessions...

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2013 Meeting

Thanks to all who made the MT AWRA 2013 Annual Meeting” Water and Energy” such a success! Keynote Speaker POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS Carol Collier – AWRA President Two Water Organizations: National AWRA – Directions for the Future and DRBC – Planning for the Basin Changing Needs [17.3 MB PDF] Mike Hightower – Sandia National Laboratories Energy Water Nexus in the Western U.S.: Emerging Trends and Impacts [3.4 MB PDF] The 2013 Annual Meeting of the Montana Section of AWRA was held in at the GranTree Inn in Bozeman, October 3-4. The theme was “Water and Energy”. Registration for the conference was 190. Thirty speakers and thirty poster presenters highlighted current water research being conducted throughout Montana. The conference also had the usual good turnout of student presenters, representing the Salish and Kootenai College, University of Montana, Montana Tech and Montana State University. A pre-conference field trip on October 2 began with a stop at Hyalite Dam where Kevin Smith (DNRC) discussed the history and operation of the dam. Rick Moroney, Superintendent for the Bozeman Water Treatment Plant led tours of the redesigned water intake along Hyalite Creek and the brand new drinking water treatment plant in Sourdough Canyon. Alan English (MBMG), formerly with the Gallatin Water Quality District, led a discussion of planning for Bozeman’s future water supply. Keynote addresses were delivered by Joe Kolman, Carol Collier, and Mike Hightower. Joe, the Director of the Environmental Policy Office of Legislative Services, gave an informative update on legislative activity during the 2013 legislative session. Carol Collier, the current national President of AWRA and Executive Director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, followed with a talk about current activities of national AWRA and challenges in the Delaware River Basin. The national AWRA conference is in Portland this November, and will be in Washington D.C. November 2014 to celebrate AWRA’s 50th anniversary. Carol described AWRA work on Integrated Water Resources Management and some upcoming organizational changes, including new committees and a revamped website. Carol also discussed potential for natural gas drilling in the Delaware River Basin and efforts by the Delaware River Basin Commission to prepare for the likely changes. Mike Hightower, an engineer with Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, wrapped up the opening session. Mike reviewed potential water resource issues in the western United States and described the need and opportunities for using non-traditional water resources to meet increasing water demands for energy and the reduction in the availability of fresh water. Mike also highlighted emerging water use and water demand trends for energy development in the western U.S. The first day of the conference was capped off with an early evening social and poster session followed by the annual banquet. Yasmin Chaudhry and Bronwyn Ralph of the Montana State University chapter of Engineers Without Borders EWB captivated banquet-goers with a dynamic presentation on their work in Khwisero Community in Western Province, Kenya. EWB is working with community boards to implement clean water and sanitation facilities for the primary schools of the district. Next on the banquet program, Bill Woessner introduced Tom Osborne as the newest water legend. Tom took the podium and reflected on lessons of a long and varied career in water resources culminating in the recitation of his poem titled Hydrology’s Last Epoch. The presence of so many young water professionals at the conference gives reason for optimism for the changing of the guard Tom spoke of. Concurrent sessions on the afternoon of the 3rd and the morning of the 4th covered topics that included groundwater, surface water, water quality evapotranspiration, climate, water-resource planning, mining and restoration....

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