Search results for Water Legend Award

1996 Legend

Phillip E. (Phil) Farnes U.S. Soil Conservation Service The Water Legend Award honors a dedicated individual who, through time, dedication and hard work, has significantly contributed to water resource activities in Montana. Phil Farnes is the year 1996 awardee. Born and raised in the Billings / Worden Montana area, Phil earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from Montana State University in 1957. Unknowingly, he began his 36 year career with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service (SCS) Snow Survey in Bozeman while still an undergraduate. Phil is a legend when it comes to understanding Montana’s snow and climate — having measured the mountain snowpack for the past 44 years. Retiring from the SCS – (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service – NRCS) in 1990, Phil established two businesses that keep him very active and in the field. Snowcap Hydrology – consulting in mountain hydrology Snowcap Photos – specializing in outdoor and wildlife photography He also works with the MSU Dept. of Earth Sciences and the USDA Forestry Sciences Lab on projects that involve “… working with climate data and its relationship to water, wildlife, fish, plants and trees in Grand Teton, Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks — Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest — and other areas.” Phil continues to reside in Bozeman MT and is also an active ‘legend’ in the Montana AWRA chapter, having helped arrange the first state meeting in...

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1997 Legend

Marvin Miller The Water Legend Award honors a dedicated individual who, through time, dedication and hard work, has significantly contributed to water resource activities in Montana. Marvin Miller is the year 1997 awardee. (The following was transcribed from a videotape. Unfortunately, some comments were lost.) Introduction — Dorothy Bradley, Director Montana Water Center 1993-1999 I am really pleased to have the opportunity to say a word about our 1997 Water Legend, Marvin Miller. To know him is to respect him and I am really proud of the fact that he is one of the Associate Directors of the Water Center, one of the things that makes our work so cohesive, productive and enjoyable. I always wanted to know a little about his background. Marv grew up in rural Wyoming and Montana with all the expected backdrops, milking cows, 4H, etc. He spent the longest time in the Big Timber area. Marv’s mother was a teacher. There were three children in the family. He loved water as a child. When Marv was a senior in high school at Big Timber, the school required him to do the obvious essay. Every day in study hall, he went through the encyclopedia to get ideas. He ended up giving a paper on geology. That sounded kind of nice. When he got out of college, he applied for different jobs in Geology and Hydrogeology and on his application he put that each of these was his favorite job. The University of Indiana summer camp offered him a job as a field teaching assistantship at their Geology camp on South Boulder River. That was in 1967 which makes this his 30th celebration. I asked Marv what his favorite job was in the 30 years and it was no surprise that he said it was the years in Saline Seep. ……… Summer fallowing is the biggest culprits water was seeping through the fallow and collecting under the surface and mixing with the salts and appearing on the surface as saline seep. Can 3 to 5 months of rain in 2 years produce 3 feet of water? It just won’t happen. ……… They have reclaimed more than 50,000 acres of saline seep using alfalfa and other deep-rooted plants. It is also interesting that other prairie states have adopted this practice from Montana. ———— He is different from most government people. Marv is a great communication person. Someone asked me how Marv was able to work with bull headed farmers and maybe even bull headed legislators. He knows how to get things done by walking around. He knows all of the parties involved, he knows what issues they are working on, what rooms they are working in, what money they have to work with and he knows what the sources of the money is. And when you put all these things together, and answer questions to make things better.——- Marv was the only speaker from Montana at a World Conference about Saline Seep. ……… We are here to honor, revere and roast Marv Miller. You are truly an inspiration, a friend, colleague, community leader and lover of fellow man. Now isn’t he great? Applause Vivian Drak, AWRA-MT V. P. presented the award to Marv. He responded with a few words of...

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1998 Legend

Ronald R. Shields Retired Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey 3162 Bozeman Avenue Helena, MT 59601-6456 ph. 406-457-5900 fx. 406-457-5990 The Water Legend Award honors a dedicated individual who, through time, dedication and hard work, has significantly contributed to water resource activities in Montana. Ronald R. Shields, a retired Hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, is the year 1998 awardee. This 1998 Montana Water Legend received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Forestry and Forest Hydrology from Penn State University during the 1960s. Ron began his career with the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division in 1966 in Albany, New York as a project hydrologist. He transferred to the Helena, Montana District office in 1969 and soon thereafter became the Chief of the Hydrologic Surveillance and Analysis Section. Ron has supervised and planned the Montana streamflow network that currently includes more than 250 stations on Montana’s streams, lakes, and reservoirs. Ron will be retiring from the USGS at the end of 2001. His 35+ years of committed experience with Montana’s streams, droughts, and floods have certainly earned him the fine rank of a Water...

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1999 Legend

Jane Holzer Director, Montana Salinity Control P.O. Box 909 Conrad, MT 59425 406.278.3071 msca@3rivers.net The Water Legend Award honors a dedicated individual who, through time, dedication and hard work, has significantly contributed to water resource activities in Montana. Jane Holzer, Director of the Montana Salinity Control is the year 1999 awardee. Videotape transcript of the water legend introduction Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center, Great Falls — Oct. 1999 (Thanks to May Mace, for transcribing this piece of oral Montana water history.) Marvin Miller introduced Steve Schmitz (DNRC) to present Jane Holzer with the Water Legend Award. STEVE — I got surprised a couple of times tonight. I overdressed just slightly and Jane asked me to dress down slightly, which I did. I didn’t realize what a momentous occasion this was going to be. Also, I didn’t realize until 2:00 this afternoon that I was going to be doing this presentation, so that’s a surprise there. Nor did I realize there were going to be four or five beers here. So this is going to go pretty well, I think. I have been requested to present this year’s Water Legend, Jane Holzer, and it is quite an honor for me to do this, Jane. We have known each other for quite a long time – twenty years or so, I’m not sure, but we go way back. Originally, Ted Dodge was gong to give this presentation but he couldn’t be here because he had a crisis that came up just this morning. The first question that I had to ask in preparing a few notes was just what is a legend? Why would Jane be a legend? In order to make that determination, I thought, “well, we should step back in time a little bit”. Jane is from Stanford and I thought I would make a couple of calls down there to see what I can find out. The first problem that I had was that nobody remembered her. I’ve been hearing about the first three legends we have. I finally found a couple of people who kinda remembered Jane, so I got a little information and a few leads along the way about what made Jane a water legend. And then among the education line, Jane was the very first in Basin County to be home schooled. And that was at the request – a strong request – from her teacher. She really excelled in education and law. We used to read in the paper that she had a couple of problems with her math and some bad multiplication. Remember the 125 mill space craft that was demised? I talked to Jane’s math teacher and that lady is absolutely convinced that Jane was behind the loss. That would make a legend. Second to the last, the sheriff chimed up and said it is finally safe for you to come back home, Jane. The statute of limitations is over. So now you can go back and have a good time in your home town. Only one other thing, the Library still wants their books back. Once she left Judith Basin at Stanford, she went over to Bozeman and got a B.S. degree in rural sociology. We never have figured out yet what rural sociology is. She did get a degree in Math. and Ag production. Talking to folks over at Bozeman, there is something about Jane that is unusual. Of her class mates or cohorts that she ran around with, nor sorority or fraternity people would give me any goods on Jane when she was in school. The thing is...

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2000 Legend

Phil Farnes ( the First Water Legend) presenting Steve with the 5th Montana Water Legend Award. W. Yellowstone, MT 10/2000. Stephan G. Custer Associate Professor of Geology, Montana State University The Water Legend Award honors a dedicated individual who, through time, dedication and hard work, has significantly contributed to water resource activities in Montana. Dr. Stephan Custer, Professor of Geology at Montana State University is the year 2000 awardee. His dedication and enthusiasm for educating his students and preparing them for work in hydrology, his field and research work on significant Montana water issues and his commitment to AWRA are just a few of the reasons Steve was nominated and voted the 2000 Water...

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